Traditional wedding clothing attire

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Traditional wedding clothing attire

 
Japanese wedding at the Meiji Shrine
  • Cheongsam or Hanfu, Chinese traditional formal wear
  • Batik and Kebaya, a garment worn by the Javanese people of Indonesia and also by the Malay people of Malaysia
 
Minangkabau marriage in Indonesia
  • Hanbok, the traditional garment of Korea
  • Barong Tagalog, an embroidered, formal men's garment of the Philippines
  • Kimono, the traditional garments of Japan
  • Sari/Lehenga, Indian popular and traditional dress in India
  • Dhoti, male garment in South India
  • Dashiki, the traditional West African wedding attire
  • Ao dai, traditional garments of Vietnam
  • Ribbon shirt, often worn by American Indian men on auspicious occasions, such as weddings, another common custom is to wrap bride and groom in a blanket
  • Kilt, male garment particular to Scottish culture
  • Kittel, a white robe worn by the groom at an Orthodox Jewish wedding. The kittel is worn only under the Chupah, and is removed before the reception.
  • Topor, a type of conical headgear traditionally worn by grooms as part of the Bengali Hindu wedding ceremony
  • Western code
    • Morning dress, western daytime formal dress
    • Stroller
    • White tie ("evening dress" in the UK; very formal evening attire)
    • Evening Suits
      • Black tie ("dinner jacket" in the UK; often referred to as a "tuxedo" in the US; traditionally appropriate only for use after 6:00 p.m. (not for weddings), but also seen in daytime, especially in the United States. It is considered inappropriate in Britain)
      • Non-traditional "tuxedo" variants (colored jackets/ties, "wedding suits")
    • Lounge suit
  • Sherwani, a long coat-like garment worn in South Asia
  • Wedding crown, worn by Syrian and Greek couples (which are called "τα στέφανα," which literally means "wreaths") and Scandinavian brides
  • Wedding veil
  • Wedding dress
  • Langa oni, traditional two piece garment worn by unmarried Telugu Hindu women.

A traditional English rhyme details what a bride should wear or carry at her wedding for good luck:

Something old,
something new,
something borrowed,
something blue,
and a silver sixpence in her shoe.

 

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